August 22, 2013

Mysterious Fibers found in McNuggets may be alive

August 22, 2013. Oak Brook, IL. This weekend, the Forensic Food Lab at Natural News announced that after numerous samples and tests, the safe food advocates have repeatedly found mysterious bodies within McDonalds’ popular Chicken McNuggets. But the real news is that these strange fibers and strands resemble living organisms. They look like tiny tape worms.

Click to enlarge - side by side comparison courtesy of Whiteout Press.

While viewing the many laboratory photos released by Natural News this weekend of the mysterious fibers found in Chicken McNuggets recently, it’s difficult to tell exactly how small these tiny bodies are. As noted, all images are blown up to 200-times actual size. And enlarged to that extent, the details are amazing as each foreign body appears similar to a foot-long strand of yarn laying on a table. In reality, the strands are described as being smaller than a human hair.



Mike Adams – Health Ranger

The report and accompanying enlarged lab photos are provided by Natural News’ Health Ranger, Mike Adams. “These new photos, shown below, appear to depict microscopic hairs, fibers or strands of varying colors and shades throughout the McDonald's Chicken McNugget samples,” Adams reports. Explaining where this particular sample of McNuggets was obtained, the author says, “The Chicken McNuggets were purchased on August 15, 2013 at a McDonald's restaurant in Austin, Texas.”

Reiterating that there is no evident cause for immediate panic, Mike Adams explains, “These microscopic images of strange fibers in Chicken McNuggets do not mean they are unsafe to consume. But they do raise many questions about the origin of the ingredients used in Chicken McNuggets, and they possibly raise red flags about quality control procedures used in the manufacture of this popular fast food."

This isn’t the first time we at Whiteout Press have written about McDonald’s Chicken McNuggets. In 2011, we exposed what it is exactly that a Chicken McNugget is made of.  Read ‘What’s in a Chicken McNugget?’ to find out. While you’re at it, you may be interested in our accompanying article from 2012, ‘What is McDonald’s McRib Sandwich made of?

Two prevailing theories

There are two main theories regarding what these mysterious fibers are and where they came from. After viewing the assortment of enlarged laboratory photos, the strands bare a strong resemblance to a couple well-known items – one from the microbiology world, and one from the manufacturing world. Either could theoretically be correct, or it could be something altogether different.

As reported by Natural News while describing one of the photos, ‘Notice that the semi-transparent fiber appears to have a "sheath" surrounding the center portion of the fiber. This seems to indicate the likelihood of a biological origin.’ The author describes another photo saying, ‘Here is an extreme close-up of a black fiber we managed to remove from a Chicken McNugget. Notice that it appears to be segmented. This may indicate it could be made of biological cells connected end to end.’

While the researcher and Natural News Editor suggest these mysterious fibers may be alive, the actual list of ingredients in a Chicken McNugget suggest these strands may be man-made and a byproduct of the manufacturing process. As documented in the above-referenced Whiteout Press article, ‘McNuggets also contain several completely synthetic ingredients, quasi-edible substances that ultimately come not from a corn or soybean field but form a petroleum refinery or chemical plant.’

Another indication that the strands may be the result of manufacturing is the indication that all the samples are roughly the same size and shape. They’re also long and flat, like a ribbon or those long, clear plastic bands that factories use to close, wrap and seal boxes so they don’t break open in transit. More than anything though, they resemble the left-overs of anything that’s been shredded or shaved. They almost look like the shavings one sweeps up from the floor after using a drill press on metal or a hand-drill on a wooden board.



Theories from consumers themselves

Since Ronald McDonald isn’t commenting on the latest McNugget scandal, consumers are taking it upon themselves to come up with their own theories. A quick scan of the many reader comments from Natural News reveals some fairly strange suggestions, as well as some very possible culprits.

While one reader suggested they were small hairs, another said, “They almost look like some sort of filamentous fungi.” Another consumer echoed this column’s thoughts saying, “Could be something off the machinery used for processing.” Reiterating another suggestion by this column, a reader named Mike humorously named them, “McTapeworms.”

A large number of others also quickly pointed the finger at some type of worm or parasite. One reader simply asked, “Some form of tapeworm?” While another insisted, “worms....they are worms.” Yet another wondered, “Looks like parasites of some kind, black ones could be whipworm??”

Another common suggestion was that the mysterious strands resemble the tiny veins many people are accustomed to seeing in fish. One reader summed up the theory asking, “Have you eaten fresh fish caught and fried? It almost looks like that now that I've been taking a better look at it, the tiny veins in fried fresh fish, whether catfish, trout, etc. Could it be that McDonalds is serving fish but has the flavor of chicken and texture?”

While consumers of Chicken McNuggets wonder what the strange fibers are, they should probably be just as worried about some of the other things inside a McNugget we actually know about. As we warned in our 2011 article, one of the ingredients in a Chicken McNugget is Tertiary Butylhydroquinone (TBHQ). TBHQ is a petroleum product sprayed not just on the McNuggets themselves to preserve freshness, but also on the inside of the boxes, to preserve their freshness as well.

According to ‘A Consumer’s Dictionary of Food Additives’ and reported in our 2011 article, ‘What’s in a Chicken McNugget’, “TBHQ is a form of butane (i.e. lighter fluid) the FDA allows processors to use sparingly in our food: It can comprise no more than 0.02 percent of the oil in a nugget. Which is probably just as well, considering that ingesting a single gram of TBHQ can cause nausea, vomiting, ringing in the ears, delirium, a sense of suffocation, and collapse. Ingesting five grams of TBHQ can kill.”

To view the entire series of enlarged photos of the mysterious bodies found in Chicken McNuggets, visit NaturalNews.com.

 

Related Whiteout Press articles:

What’s in a Chicken McNugget?

What is a McDonald’s McRib Sandwich made of?

McDonald’s GMO Potatoes and USDA July 2 Deadline

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