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August 17, 2012

TrapWire and time travel, Denzel movie Déjà vu is real

August 17, 2012. Alexandria. The movie Déjà vu was a 2006 sci-fi thriller staring Denzel Washington and Val Kilmer. To stop a mad bomber, government agents use the latest secret technology to tap into every single surveillance source in existence. They can travel back in time, but only to watch and listen, any time, any person, any place. Thanks to Wikileaks, the world just learned that the program is real.

Corporation perfects surveillance to the point of inventing virtual time travel. Image courtesy of PrisonPlanet.com.

The underground rebellion

Over the past year, the cyber rebel groups Anonymous and Lulz Sec have waged a war against the super-secret, semi-government rogue agencies that have taken on the identity of ‘big brother’. Joined by groups like Wikileaks, they have exposed governments across the globe for their illegal actions, mass spying and crimes against humanity.



Stratfor

Working off of a long list of mercenary corporations working for government agencies like the CIA and Mossad, Anonymous and Lulz Sec finally hit an unknown company in Virginia called Stratfor. In an embarrassing moment for the company that bills itself as the premier protector against cyber terrorism, Stratfor’s secret employees, many former CIA agents, had their identities and personal financial information exposed to the world. Losses were pegged at $700,000. But the humiliation and realization that a bunch of hacker kids penetrated their defenses was even more damaging.

Read the March 2012 Whiteout Press article, ‘Rebel Underground gets 2 small Victories’ for more information.

TrapWire

When corporations like Visa and Paypal froze the bank accounts of Wikileaks, Anonymous struck the two financial giants in retaliation. When the CIA, NSA and secret public-private corporations like Stratfor devastated the ranks of the rebel hackers with widespread arrests, Wikileaks returned the favor.

Targeting the seemingly sovereign corporation Stratfor, the company that is called ‘the private CIA’, Wikileaks published more than 5 million pages of Stratfor corporate emails. The contents are first coming to light. But just the first cursory inspection has revealed one of the most shocking, and yet impressive, covert government spy tactic ever dreamed of.

The TrapWire corporate website describes the program saying, ‘TrapWire is a unique, predictive software system designed to detect patterns of pre-attack surveillance and logistical planning and introduce the basis for a paradigm shift in the methodologies traditionally applied to securing critical infrastructure, key resources and personnel.’

In other words, the company claims that by monitoring everyone everywhere, it can predict a terrorist attack before it happens. The federal corporation accomplishes this feat by noting common traits and actions that past terrorist have done just prior to their attacks.

For instance, if four different attackers go from a gun store to a church to a school in the course of an hour, these spy masters simply watch for any individual nationwide that completes the first two acts, and then circumvents the individual before he or she can get to that third point – the school. Or a more real-life example would be if a Saudi with a temporary visa enrolls in a flight school, like so many of the 9/11 hijackers, that would tip off agents that another future hijacking is in the works.

While that’s how the company bills itself, others like us here at Whiteout Press see a much more awe-inspiring use for this technology – time travel. The concept is so crazy, Hollywood made a movie called Déjà vu about it in 2006. If you haven’t seen it, it’s now a must-see.



Déjà vu – the real thing

The movie trailer describes Déjà vu saying, “An ATF agent travels back in time to save a woman from being murdered, falling in love with her during the process.” For the record, the only part about the very real TrapWire program different from the movie is the part where people can interact with the past, thus changing the future. The rest of the unbelievable movie is a perfect match with today’s TrapWire technology.

In the movie, a bomber blows up a crowded ferry killing hundreds of people. Federal agents use all available surveillance details to create a virtual movie of the past. Looking at the victims’ previous few days before the explosion, as if they were following them around in real life, the agents look for clues as to who the bomber was and what his motives were.

Time travel

The program TrapWire is the exact same premise. It allows agents to view and listen to anybody’s past actions, movements and conversations. Authorities can pick any person, any location and any day or time and load video and audio of that period onto their computer monitors. They can shift the view 360 degrees. They can listen in on phone conversations, read emails and even walk with the surveillance target as they walk their dog. The only limitations are that they can only look back in time, never forward. And they can only watch and listen, never interact.

How do they do it? As described by the TrapWire website, the agency-corporation does it by capturing the audio, video and all other types of secret surveillance being captured by corporations and governments the world over. The company’s spies have access to everything including phone calls, red light cameras, store cameras, laptop cameras, computers, etc. And the best source – satellites that can read a postage stamp from outer space.

Like billions of individual puzzle pieces, the never-ending chunks and streams of audio and video information come into the company. TrapWire takes those puzzle pieces and instantly assembles them into complete puzzles, always changing by the second. Each one is a snapshot of the past. Logged into massive computer systems, agents can then pick any person, time or place, and watch the past unfold in real time, right before their eyes.

For those who are uncomfortable with this level of spying, there is one slight consolation. As detailed in the Whiteout Press Special Report ‘Top Secret America’, the federal government tried the exact same idea a decade ago. It ended in massive failure after wasting billions of dollars. The problem was the shear volume of text, audio and video coming in on a second-by-second basis. The federal government couldn’t handle the volume and make the program work. Based on the treasure trove of Stratfor emails released by Wikileaks, it looks as though someone perfected the time travel technology, but it wasn’t the US government.

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